MIX 2012: The Aftermath…


Posted: October 6th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Research, Rhetoric, Self-Promotion, Teaching, Typography/Graphic Design, Writing | Tags: , | No Comments »


You’ll recall in my previous post that I presented a talk this past Friday on using comics to teach rhetoric at the MIX 2012 Conference, CCAD’s Celebration of Comics. My panelists, Wendy Chrisman (CCAD), Nathan Wallace (OSU Marion), and Gretchen Scharnagl (Florida Int’l U) all gave great talks as well on, respectively, representations of psychiatric and mental disorders in comics, using comics to interpret British literature, and a service learning project which involved a team of art students producing a comic book for a hospital to raise awareness about childhood cancer. If you’re curious, here’s my slideshow from the event (and, if you’re even more curious, shoot me an email at mccorkle.12@osu.edu; I can send you the transcript of my remarks).


Upcoming Panel Presentation: MIX 2012


Posted: October 3rd, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Rhetoric, Teaching, Typography/Graphic Design, Writing | Tags: , | No Comments »


MIX 2012 CCADThis Friday, I’ll be a panelist at this year’s MIX 2012 conference/exhibit, an event hosted by CCAD. You should go, not so much for my presentation (although it will be pretty cool), but because Chris Ware will be there—he of Jimmy Corrigan fame. But in case you’re interested in my part, I’ll be on the panel titled “A Pedagogical Mix: Utilizing Comics in Higher Education” along with Wendy Chrisman, Nathan Wallace, and Gretchen Scharnagl, talking about comics’ potential for teaching about rhetorical theory. And as my grandmother used to say, “See you in the funny papers!”

TIME/LOCATION: 11 a.m., Canzani Center Auditorium


Cornfield Review: Online–Out Now!


Posted: August 24th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Bookshelf, Teaching, Typography/Graphic Design, Writing | No Comments »


splash graphicHot on the heels of the release of the 2012 print edition of Cornfield Review comes the latest installment of CR:Online, the digital media supplement featuring artists, photographers, writers, and designers from the OSUM/MTC/CSCC community. Give it  a gander.


Cornfield Review 2012 Out Now


Posted: August 22nd, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Bookshelf, Teaching, Typography/Graphic Design, Writing | No Comments »


CR2012 coverHey, you guys: The latest installment of Cornfield Review, OSU Marion’s long-lived student-edited literary magazine, is currently available for your reading pleasure. Print copies are available for free at various locations around campus, and a downloadable version of it is available at: http://cornfieldreview.osu.edu/issue/view/96/showToc. Get yours today!


Cornfield Review: Submissions Extended for One Week.


Posted: February 14th, 2011 | Author: | Filed under: Teaching, Typography/Graphic Design, Writing | No Comments »


extensionflyersmall

The Cornfield Review, OSU Marion’s student literary
publication, is still accepting your original photographs, works
of art, prose, and poetry pieces until February 21, 2011!

We want it all…the funny, serious, light, dark, artistic, sad…

We just want to see the creative part of YOU.

For more information, or to submit your work, please log onto:

http://cornfieldreview.osu.edu/


Cornfield Review: Online (2010)


Posted: October 12th, 2010 | Author: | Filed under: Internet, Teaching, Typography/Graphic Design, Writing | No Comments »


crotitle

The new issue of Cornfield Review: Online is go! See it here.


Take My Class… Please!


Posted: February 25th, 2010 | Author: | Filed under: Internet, Self-Promotion, Teaching, Typography/Graphic Design, web 2.0 | No Comments »


‘Cause I worked really hard on this flyer:

269flyersmall

ENG 269: Digital Media Composing
M/W 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm

5 credit hours. Fulfills GEC requirement for: Arts and Humanities, Analysis of Texts and Works of Art, Visual/Performing Arts. Meets group elective requirement of professional writing minor.

COURSE DESCRIPTION:
Web 2.0. The Cloud. Social Networking. Twitter. Podcasting. Ten years ago, we would have been scratching our heads trying to figure out the meanings of these cryptic terms, but today, they are becoming increasingly commonplace for us. More and more, we have a hand in actively shaping the landscape that creates such terms: the Internet. For this course, we will focus on the issues associated with creating digital media content (in other words, using computers to make meaning by combining words, images, and sound). In addition to examining the formal properties and social implications of digital media texts (the various genres of online discourse and how they circulate through the web), we will also investigate the practical , rhetorical, and ethical dimensions of composing in a digital world. No experience with digital media is required for this course, but during the quarter, you will develop a digital portfolio that includes a variety of larger and smaller projects using different combinations of images, audio, and animation. Texts TBD.


“The Preservation of Favoured Traces” [LINK]


Posted: February 5th, 2010 | Author: | Filed under: Open Source, Typography/Graphic Design, Writing | No Comments »


darwin

Fans of Darwin, the history of science, digital media studies, open source software, and electronic textual editing should take a look at Ben Fry’s fantastic animated text of On the Origin of Species, which accounts for textual changes across the six editions of the book that were published during Darwin’s life (from 1859 – 1872). The text was assembled using an open source animation program  called Processing. As Fry himself says, one big advantage of seeing the text evolve over several editions at once is the ability to illustrate shifts in Darwin’s scientific thinking, both large and small:

We often think of scientific ideas, such as Darwin’s theory of evolution, as fixed notions that are accepted as finished. [...]  In the changes are refinements and shifts in ideas — whether increasing the weight of a statement, adding details, or even a change in the idea itself. [...] Using the six editions as a guide, we can see the unfolding and clarification of Darwin’s ideas as he sought to further develop his theory during his lifetime.
Link: On the Origin of Species: The Preservation of Favoured Traces

CORNFIELD REVIEW: Now Accepting Submissions.


Posted: January 25th, 2010 | Author: | Filed under: Teaching, Typography/Graphic Design, Writing | Tags: | No Comments »


possible

THE CORNFIELD REVIEW is a quarterly publication of poetry, prose, art and photography. Submit your invention by Feb. 14th, and your creative talent could be captured for posterity between its pages. For the brave and reckless among you who seek fame and glory, send your ponderings and creations to mccorkle.12@osu.edu. Limitations on submissions are 20 pages prose, 8 individual poems, and 12 photographs/artworks. There is no work that does not fit–it’s all just one more piece of the evolving puzzle.

[copy and image courtesy of students from my ENG 662 ("Literary Publishing") course.--bm]


CCAD Presentation: Slideshow


Posted: September 14th, 2009 | Author: | Filed under: Research, Rhetoric, Typography/Graphic Design | No Comments »


visrhetslideshow

(Note: For most readers, the context for this show is probably unclear, especially since the design is a little light on the text. This accompanied a talk/discussion I gave for a couple groups of students at CCAD. Questions? email me at mccorkleDOT12ATosuDOTedu.)


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